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, 2003, the united states was pushing very hard to get iran referred to the u.s. security council for not being forthcoming. remember that there was the war in iraq. there was a strong push on the part of the europeans, especially britain, germany, and france not to go to the security council because they saw iran going the way of iraq. going to the security council would be a mandate for war. countries like france had been at odds with the united states over iraq and did not want to be at odds with the u.s. over iran, but wanted to stop the united states from doing what it did to iraq. we had a dramatic event where the foreign ministers of germany, in october, 2003, struck an agreement where iran would embark on uranium enrichment. it is the ultimate in dual use technology. it had the united states stepping back and britain, germany, and france became known as the eu3. in november of 2004, iran went along with this saying they would also be a part of uranium enrichment. but he doesn't buy, eu3 was submitting a proposal to iran promising help for its program. this is where you get
. >> this is not a case of protests directed at the united states at large or at united states policy but in response to a video that is offensive. >>chris: you do not believe that? >>guest: absolutely. in fact, it is the case. we have had the evolution of the arab spring the last many months. what sparked the violence was the airing on the internet of a hateful and offensive video that has offended many people around the world. our strong view is there is no excuse for violence, it is absolutely reprehensible and never justifyied. but there are those who have reacted with violence and the governments have increasingly responded and protected our facilities and condemned the violence. this outrageous response to what is an offensive video. in question that in the past with "satanic verses," and cartoon of the prophet mohammed, there have been protesters that have sparked. >>chris: critics say this outpouring of outrage against the united states has everything to do with the u.s. policies. that we are disengaging from that part of the world, we pulled out of iraq, we pulled out of afghanistan, and ira
towards the united states and its citizens. >> schieffer: was this a long-planned attack, as far as you know. what do you know about that? >> the way this perpetrators acted, moved, and their choosing specific date for this so-called demonstration, i think we have no-- this leaves us with no doubt that this was preplanned, predetermined. >> schieffer: and you believe this was the work of al qaeda and you believe that it was led by foreigners. is that what you're telling us? >> it was plans definitely, was planned by forers, by people who entered the country a few months ago, and they were planning this criminal act since their arrival. >> schieffer: mr. president, is it safe for americans there now? >> the security situation is-- is difficult, not only for americans. even for libbians themselves. we don't know what are the real intentions. of these perpetrators. how they will react. but there is no specific particular concern, danger for americans or any other foreigners. but the situation is not easy to keep stability. yes >> mr. president, will it be safe for the f.b.i. investigators
on america in our history. today people gather across the united states, around the world to remember the tragic events on 9/11. some take part in ceremonies like this. others spent time in quiet reflection and prayer. all of us take a moment to remember again where we were at that fateful moment. here together as one family, we pause to honor and to pray and to remember the 184 lives lost at the pentagon. more than 2700 killed in lower manhattan. and the 40 who perished in that field in pennsylvania on flight 93. these victims families remember those who were lost as mothers and fathers, brothers and sisters, sons and daughters. the family members here today know that the entire nation joins you in mourning the loss of your loved ones. we're honored by your presence and just as your loved ones are heroes for ever, so are all of you. today we also recognize and remember other heroes, those first responders who rushed to the scene behind me into the fire to save lives and help in anyway possible. we owe all of you a special debt. we appreciate all you do it to provide aid and comfort t
the long-term. despite the bumpy path and the disturbing images, it's in the united states fundamental interest that people have the ability to choose their own governments, that the governments be democratic and free. that's in our long-term best interest. we need to reinforce that. >> we are in the middle of a heated presidential campaign. there are different foreign policy visions. that's why we wanted to dedicate the hour today to understand these different views. mitt romney spoke out this week, criticizing the administration, talking about whether the united states was apologizing for some of the initial response to this. these were his comments this week. >> the administration was wrong to stand by a statement sympathizing with those who had breached our embassy in egypt instead of condemning their actions. i think it's a terrible course for america to stand in apology for our values. >> our embassies did not stand up for free speech in this initial response to this violence. and the republican charge is that it's weakness on the part of this administration that invites this kin
, criticizing the administration, talking about whether the united states was apologizing for some of the initial response to this. these were his comments this week. >> the administration was wrong to stand by a statement sympathizing with those who had breached our embassy in egypt instead of condemning their actions. i think it's a terrible course for america to stand in apology for our values. >> our embassies did not stand up for free speech in this initial response to this violence. and the republican charge is that it's weakness on the part of this administration that invites this kind of chaos that the administration has not been tough enough on radical extremists that are beginning to take root in these countries. how do you respond to that? >> first of all, i think the american people and certainly our diplomats and development experts putting their lives on the line every day around the world expect from our leadership unity in times of challenge. and strong, steady, steadfast leadership of the sort that president obama has been providing. with respect to this, i think,
's policies. let's watch. >> this is not a case of protests directed at the united states at large or at u.s. policy. this is in response to a video that is offensive. >> chris: you don't really believe that? >> chris, absolutely i believe that. in fact, it is the case. we had the evolution of the arab spring over the last many months but what sparked the recent violence was the airing on the internet of a very hateful very offensive video that has offended many people around the world. now, our strong view is that there is no excuse for violence. it is reprehensible and never justified but in fact there have been those in various parts of the world who have reacted with violence. their governments have increasingly and effectively responded and protected our facilities and condemned the violence and this outrageous response to what is an offensive individual yo video. there is no question what we have seen in the past with satanic verses and the cartoon of the prophet muhammad there have been such things that have sparked outrage and anger and this has been the proximate cause. >> chris:
the united states needs to do is take the kind of leadership that will organize the international community to address these crises, and it does not appear that is happening in the way that is productive and it's the result that we want. which is basically not to have the interest at the military level. at least two other feelings, the power vacuum, and ultimately, those who fall into the power vacuum are radical islamists. >> while americans still have widespread support from libya, shown by pro-western demonstrations, they need the help of the libyan government to track down the ambassador's killers. >> with america and now, based on the old strategy or tactics, and that means all the work done by president obama's administration has just disappeared. it is like a waste of time. i believe america successfully manage to pull itself out of the so-called war on terror, which is very important for the future between us and america and the arab world. >> it is also the new arab leaders. they met in europe this week to seek financial assistance. >> we stand against anybody who harbors these fau
bless america, these united states. thank you very much everybody. i hope you get the book. [applause] mike has agreed to take a couple of questions before we get out of here. the first one, right here. >> we did not bring issues. >> where is chick-fil-a? >> it was getting too cold. we will make the diet that i could hear your answer because there were too many -- prius is clicking by. what was your answer about why they don't have any conservative moderators in the upcoming debate? >> it's a perfect metaphor for the machine we are up against. if you expect this is going to be an easy ride for governor romney, it's not in its unbelievable there are going to be liberals who are going to be moderating the debates. the bardot is a so much higher for governor romney then it is president obama and we know that going in and we have to accept that it's tough. >> the next question over here. 's vi of the quick question. my first question is what is this thing between you and hewitt concerning the -- [inaudible] >> apparently you're not you are not supposed to say his name because he moved the
home and figure out what they will do and the relationship they will have with the united states and control radical islamism in their country. >> congressman allen west will join us for tomorrow for a special edition of justice. definitely the question is, be those governments control the radical islamist. good evening, ambassador. >> good tock with you. >> ambassador, why is this happening? >> i think what is been going across the middle east for the several yearings has been a wave of radical islamism. a high loo politicizing version of an extreme interpretation of the muslim religion and it is it gaining force it most vividly in the terrorist actions that hes bollah and hamas. and we see it as the 18 months of what some people thought was arab spring. it was not a democracy movement and may have been against the rulers in libya and tunisia and else where. but it was not for a swift democracy. the proof is in the streets that's threat we face. >> this is it a country we help tod liberate. benghazi is a city that we defended. how could we not have known that based on the instan
in egypt, say is turkey the model, i say there is no good model. even the united states of america is not a model if you are serious about freedom, dignity and also the power of the state. because i'm ready to talk about -- i will come to that point about separating, you know, the state from religion. but if you separate or distinguish the state from religion, tell me what you put instead of religion. because what we are facing in the west now -- and we all know this as citizens -- i live in europe, you live in the united states of america, and we all know that the problem that we have with our democracies now is not the dramatic decision of religions, but some magic decisions of transnational corporation and economic power that are deciding without us being able to think anything. and we call it democracy, we're still today dealing with powers that are beyond the democratic procedures. the banks, transnational corporations. and we are facing with people who are deciding. for example, in greece, in spain, in italy we have technocrats who are coming to solve the problem. we never el
risks for the united states, to go into these troubled areas to know who is doing what with whom and to help those who stand on our side of what we hope change will bring. i think it's very, very important not to disengage from this vital region. we have to find a way to doesn't involve military invasions of course. the count re's weary of that. we have to find ways to support those who are more secular in their outlook, they may not be a majority or the strongest, but these are our long-term allies. >> you are saying, there has to be tolerance for cultural differences. but my big concern that that folks don't want to go and assume those posts because of the danger and then how will we get information like the video running in egypt, if we don't have the right number of people in the right places... our national security, could it be jeopardized? >> of course, there are time when is diplomats will famously step forward, as happened in the disgraceful moment in the state department, saying going to iraq would be a death sentence. that wasn't true. we didn't lose diplomats there. b
you would expect the president of the united states to be careful, and the secretary of state. and they are. we should not allow ourselves to be dragged into a theological argument. that is not their job. and then you focus on the real issue. americans have a problem with embassies. since 1979, no country in the world has problems with indices like the americans. -- indices like the americans. -- embassies like the americans. i have respect for all religions. i have a jaundiced view of turbaned men engaging in politics. did you see muslim embassies being stormed to anywhere in the world? >> i know you want to comment on that. i do think -- let's keep it to egypt. there is a feeling that we have lost their way a little bit. there was not that much support for the democratic uprisings in the region. it came to the question of mubarak a little bit belatedly. the perception in the white house, we got dragged into libya in an operation that we were not that enthusiastic about. when you're keeping as far away as possible -- we are keeping as far away as possible from what is going o
to be the standard security in high risk consuls and embassies that the united states has around the world and that includes no low refile armored vehicles, the vehicles that have the tires that will continue to operate even if they're shot out. and other security measures were not there on the ground. general jack keane commented on the security that was missing here on fox. >> there's been a pattern of attacks all through the summer. so we have a pat he tern of specific aggressive attacks and finally, our consulate is attacked. now, that's a movement that's doing that and that is coordinated. i don't think any film, even 9/11 maybe the day they chose to do it because of its significance, but that's certainly people who are out of power, there are moderates in power in libya, they want it undermine that government and foreign powers assisting that government are the target. common sense will tell you that our security for that ambassador and that consulate was totally inadequate. and after we do that assessment and we're putting the proper security in place, rest assured whatever it looks
by an arlington, va., next. caller: thank you. ron paul needs to abolish the federal reserve or the united states treasury will take over printing money. then the investments would be safe. thank you. host: jeff, republican line, good morning. caller: good morning. as an individual, i have tried to save, realizing that social security was at risk and so forth. i have spoken to people in houston from argentina. frequently. my boss is from argentina. i have to say that if you are unaware of the debt of economic collapse, you really need to find someone who has experienced it. if our credit rating does collapse and we have to pay realistic interest rates, we could not even make the interest on the debt with our taxes, currently. host: jeff, thank you for the call. with the overall debt now in excess of $16 trillion, "the new york times" phrase -- framed it in terms of saving enough. david on the twitter page has this point -- host: shock is on the phone from hawaii, up early on this sunday morning. caller: yes, they have not saved enough. my social security is very minimal. i have been working for m
his distinguished career in the foreign service, he won friends to the united states in far-flung places. he made those people's hopes his own. during the revolution in libya, he risked his life to help protect the libyan people from a tyrant. he gave his life helping them build a better country. people loved to work with him. as he rose through the ranks, they loved to work forehand. he was known not only for his courage, but for his smile. goofy, but contagious. for his sense of fun and that california cool. in the days since the attack, so many libyans, including the ambassador, who is with us today, have expressed their sorrow and solidarity. one young woman, her head covered and her eyes haunted with sadness, held up a handwritten sign that said "thugs and killers do not represent a benghazi or islam." the president of the palestinian authority, who worked closely with chris sent me a letter of remembering his energy and integrity and deploring "an act of ugly terror." many others from across the middle east and africa have offered similar sentiments. this has been a di
and protests in many different countries. i've made it clear that the united states has a profound respect for people of all faiths. we stand for religious freedom. and we reject the den grags of any religion, including islam. >> just as freedom of speech has consequences so do all aspects of the democratic prospects. we watched as high hopes as the very same countries that have been burning american flags this week embrace democracy during the arab spring. how do we balance this tolerance against our own country's very real need for security? these are complicated questions. life or death questions. ones that we rely on our presidents and their administrations to address on our behalf. this is the work of the commander in chief. violence in streets across the arab world in the past days should remind us that these clearly are not abstract policy questions. they're not just about etiology. this was somehow, it seems, lost on the republican presidential challenger and his foreign policy team this week. governor mitt romney rushed out of the gate with this statement late on tuesday night. sa
of law. >> host: you spoke about day and you criticize the united states, particularly in this area in the book for having what you call a reflexive reaction against any palestinian use of united nations. utilization of the united nations. do you think america is standing in the way of a broader peace effort in the middle east? >> guest: i cannot say that america -- i do say america's standing in the way. what i can say is that it will require a sustained and determined effort by the u.s., working with some of the countries in the region, and europe to bring about peace in the region. it has not been sustained. in fact, i'm not sure i can say there is a peace process today. and i think the u.s. has such a pivotal role to play. and both parties look to u.s. leadership. there were times when you look to see if one had gotten very close. when president putin was trying to get the solution, working at night, on the point it seemed very close. but since then we haven't been that close, and there hasn't been a real effort to bring the parties together. and there are people who are now beg
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)